Week 5 Sample Social Media Posts

Use these sample posts and images to help us promote and share resources about Tip #5 of the 
5 Tips for Educators throughout the last week of See Us, Support Us.

 

DOWNLOAD ALL SEE US, SUPPORT US IMAGES HERE

Sample Tweets and Images

TIP #5 TWEETS

  • It is the last week of #SeeUsSupportUs and the final tip for educators who are supporting students with incarcerated parents is to advocate for school policies that support affirming environments and restorative practices. https://www.susu-osborne.org/5-tips-for-educators
     

  • Final tip for educators: consider advocating for educational policies that see & support children w/incarcerated parents. Restorative & trauma-informed practices can increase access to resources that support student's development, rather than punish them https://www.susu-osborne.org/5-tips-for-educators
     

  • #SeeUsSupportUs Tip #5 for educators: Advocate for school policies that support affirming environments and restorative practices. Championing policy change shows students you care about their well-being and models how they can be an advocate for change. https://www.susu-osborne.org/5-tips-for-educators

Tip#5 Twitter-01.png

(Pair the sample tweets in this section with the above image or any of the images on the General SUSU posts page)

RESOURCES ABOUT TIP #5 TWEETS

TAKE ACTION TWEETS

​[DO THIS AS A TWEET THREAD.  THERE IS A PLUS SIGN AT THE BOTTOM OF DRAFT TWEETS WHERE YOU CAN ADD MULTIPLE TWEETS IN A ROW]
 

First tweet:

  • #SeeUsSupportUs Take action to advocate for school policies that support children on incarcerated parents:

    1.) Request professional development on how to support students with incarcerated parents from an organization that offers this training.

 

Second tweet:

  • 2.) Advocate for your school to develop a protocol for how to engage incarcerated parents in educational meetings and sharing a child’s educational records when appropriate.

Third tweet:

  • 3.) Request professional development on how to implement trauma-informed and restorative justice practices, with a racial justice lens, at your school or district-wide.
     

Fourth tweet:

  • 4.) Consider the experiences of students with incarcerated parents in all policy and practice discussions, professional development, staff  meetings, and all
    decision-making processes.

Fifth tweet:

  • 5.) Advocate for support for social workers and school counselors who can build capacity for supporting the children of incarcerated parents and train educators on restorative justice practices.
     

Sixth tweet: 

  • 6.) Approach school policy decisions with a racial justice and trauma-informed lens, providing tools and training for staff to dismantle systemic racism in meetings, among staff, and in the classroom.#SeeUsSupportUs 

Sample Facebook/Instagram Posts and Images
Tip#5 FB&Insta-01.png

TIP #5 POST

  • It is the last week of #SeeUsSupportUs! The final tip for educators who are supporting students with incarcerated parents is to advocate for school policies that support affirming environments and restorative practices. Implementing restorative and trauma-informed practices can increase access to resources that heal and support a child’s development, rather than punish a child for behavior that is often rooted in unmet needs. Championing policy change also shows students you care about their well-being and models how they can be an advocate for change: https://www.susu-osborne.org/5-tips-for-educators

RESOURCES ABOUT TIP #5 POST

  • Police presence in schools can trigger many traumatic memories for children with incarcerated parents. Educate yourself on the harms of police presence and punitive practices in schools and advocate for alternatives, including restorative justice practices. Check out this great resource from Girls for Gender Equity: https://www.ggenyc.org/the-schools-girls-deserve/police-free-schools-toolkit

TAKE ACTION POST

  • #SeeUsSupportUs Take action to advocate for school policies that support children

with incarcerated parents:
 

  1. Request professional development on how to support students with incarcerated parents from an organization that offers this training.

  2. Advocate for your school to develop a protocol for how to engage incarcerated parents in educational meetings and sharing a child’s educational records when appropriate.

  3. Request professional development on how to implement trauma-informed and restorative justice practices, with a racial justice lens, at your school or district-wide.

  4. Consider the experiences of students with incarcerated parents in all policy and practice discussions, professional development, staff  meetings, and alldecision-making processes.

  5. Advocate for support for social workers and school counselors who can build capacity for supporting the children of incarcerated parents and train educators on restorative justice practices.

  6. Approach school policy decisions with a racial justice and trauma-informed lens, providing tools and training for staff to dismantle systemic racism in meetings, among staff, and in the classroom.#SeeUsSupportUs 

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Instagram

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Thank you to Echoes of Incarceration, Jacobia Dahm, and Salvador Espinoza for their photos.