Week 4 Sample Social Media Posts

Use these sample posts and images to help us promote and share resources about Tip #4 of the 
5 Tips for Educators throughout the fourth week of See Us, Support Us.

 

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Sample Tweets and Images

TIP #4 TWEETS

  • #SeeUsSupportUs Tip #4 for educators: Consider the language, narratives, & teaching resources you use. Negative narratives about incarcerated people are prominent in our society, and we must be careful not to unknowingly perpetuate stereotypes. Learn more: https://www.susu-osborne.org/5-tips-for-educators
     

  • The language we use when speaking to a child or group of students about incarcerated people and their families matters. Using humanizing language and keeping the conversation open allows children to define how they feel about their parent(s), not how they think they should feel.
     

  • Educators: Consider the language, narratives, and teaching resources you use. Thoughtfully including the experiences of children w/incarcerated parents in teaching lessons is an opportunity to change harmful narratives and help students feel comfortable sharing their experience.

Tip#4 Twitter-01.png

(Pair the sample tweets in this section with the above image or any of the images on the General SUSU posts page)

RESOURCES ABOUT TIP #4 TWEETS

TAKE ACTION TWEETS

  • #SeeUsSupportUs Tip #4 for Educators: Be mindful and critical of the narratives and statistics in the news, movies, music, research, etc. that dehumanize incarcerated people and criminalize certain communities, People of Color, and families with incarcerated loved ones.
     

  • Tip for Educators: Consider how a student with an incarcerated parent might respond to specific films, video clips, books about the justice system that you show in class or assign as homework. #SeeUsSupportUs
     

  • Tip for Educators: Recognize personal biases and remain focused on asking the child and family how you can support them. Refrain from sharing personal biases in classroom settings. #SeeUsSupportUs
     

  • [DO THIS AS A TWEET THREAD]
    First tweet: #SeeUsSupportUs tip for educators: When a student with an incarcerated parent shares their experience with you, keep the conversation open-ended by: 1.) Asking about their feelings and what they need rather than asking why the parent is incarcerated
    Second tweet:
     2.) Listening more. Be ok with silence. Your presence and willingness to listen is supportive.  3.) Affirming what they are experiencing and feeling while reassuring them that they are not alone and not responsible for what has happened with their parent. 

Sample Facebook/Instagram Posts and Images
Tip#4 FB&Insta-01.png

TIP #4 POST

  • #SeeUsSupportUs Tip #4 for educators: Consider the language, narratives, & teaching resources you use. Negative narratives about incarcerated people are prominent in our society, and we must be careful not to unknowingly perpetuate stereotypes. Thoughtfully including the experiences of children w/incarcerated parents in teaching lessons is an opportunity to change harmful narratives and help students feel comfortable sharing their experience.

    The language we use when speaking to a child or group of students about incarcerated people and their families matters. Using humanizing language and keeping the conversation open allows children to define how they feel about their parent(s), not how they think they should feel.

    https://www.susu-osborne.org/5-tips-for-educators

RESOURCES ABOUT TIP #4 POST

  • Resources for #SeeUsSupportUs Tip #4 for educators: Consider using humanizing, person-first language when speaking about a student’s parent or people who are incarcerated.

    1.) Find ways to do this with @osborneny's #WordsMatter resource: https://www.susu-osborne.org/words-matter


    2.) As you read research and statistics on children w/incarcerated parents, check your implicit bias and the implicit bias of the author to make sure interpretation of the research is not reinforcing stereotypes or negative outcomes for children, like this one: https://www.ccsu.edu/imrp/Publicatons/Files/CIP_Seven_Out_of_Ten_Not_Even_Close.pdf

TAKE ACTION POSTS

  • #SeeUsSupportUs Educators, take action and support students with incarcerated parents by considering the language, narratives, and teaching resources you use.

    –Be mindful and critical of the narratives and statistics in the news, movies, music, research, etc. that dehumanize incarcerated people and criminalize certain communities, People of Color, and families with incarcerated loved ones.  
    –Consider how a student with an incarcerated parent might respond to specific films, video clips, books about the justice system that you show in class or assign as homework. 

    –Recognize personal biases and remain focused on asking the child and family how you can support them. Refrain from sharing personal biases in classroom settings. 
     

  • Tip #4 of the 5 Tips for Educators seeing and supporting children with incarcerated parents is to consider the language and narratives you use. When a student with an incarcerated parent shares their experience with you, keep the conversation open-ended by:
    1.) Asking about their feelings and what they need rather than asking why the parent is incarcerated

    2.) Listening more. Be ok with silence. Your presence and willingness to listen is supportive. 
    3.) Affirming what they are experiencing and feeling while reassuring them that they are not alone and not responsible for what has happened with their parent. 

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Thank you to Echoes of Incarceration, Jacobia Dahm, and Salvador Espinoza for their photos.